Author Topic: Long time researcher  (Read 3208 times)

AdrianBurton

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2017, 09:30:42 AM »
Welcome to the forum

something else to consider.... if you build it yourself in the 10 yrs it typically takes to build that car, you can learn all or most of the skills required to maintain the car but the family situation WILL change, that is part of the reason why these things take so long to build.

The tube chassis will add to the cost and complexity of the build because you have to add ALL of the systems like brakes, wiring, AC, lights etc and that can sway your budget by thousands of dollars.... having said that buy as COMPLETE a car as possible, it will be a larger upfront investment but the time and mney saved will be INVALUABLE

Vanorin287

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2017, 08:52:54 AM »
lambobuilder --

Thanks. I've done a similar project for college competition (electric-hybrid car), and definitely understand the amount of dedication and work that goes into building a car. We had a huge team of engineering students: mechanical, computer, chemical, and electrical; pretty much required all of us to get it done. Even with a team, it was a two semester long project and we weren't even concerned about the aesthetics.

76mx --

What a small world…  ::wave

Definitely understand the frustration of having things lay around and take space at your location. Is there an ETA on Carlos? I don't mind waiting if you recommend that he's got the best. That gives us a bit more time to square away details.

PS: How can I follow the Chupacabra business? Very interested in keeping up to date on that.

lambobuilder

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2017, 07:46:41 AM »
You may also want to look at my eManual to get an idea of what is involved. Just click the Test Drive button and you can read the first two chapters for free. http://www.lambobuilder.com/emtemp/intro.htm
Dale

76mx

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2017, 08:27:11 PM »
Vanorin,
   I live in Fort Worth, and Haltom City is directly between me and downtown Fort Worth. The Aventador of Carlos is accurate, but supply is another thing. This logjam has got to give, I have stuff here waiting on his bodies. If they cannot be done soon, we will be forced to go with Duraflex. I have known Carl from my racing days and he always had good product, but right now Carlos has the only known quantity. One word of caution here, the $50,000 number mentioned several times is a good number for building it yourself, it could likely be double that for a contracted build, especially for an Aventador.

Vanorin287

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2017, 05:10:15 PM »
76mx --

Sweet, I am definitely interested. You're right, research is still not done. My excel sheet keeps me organized, as you mentioned even down to which gearshift knob to use  8). A google on "Chupacabra Strickland" shows some cool videos, do you have a page with more info?

Currently located on the East Coast -- floating between NYC/DC for work. Friends and family are scattered throughout VA/TX (Odessa, near Midland), and my childhood friend still lives in Haltom City. We usually meet up throughout the year.

Noted about coming to watch -- my background is in electrical and computer engineering. I probably wouldn't be too useful anyways. Because of my engineering background, a lot of my friends are mechanical engineers. In school I ended up tagging along with them for their lab assignments. Learned quite a bit of CAD; only downside is that I wasn't allowed to use the machines for welding, etc…

They would complain about how hard mechanical engineering was almost everyday, especially about thermo and statics. I was like, "Oh this can't be that hard? I'll do that statics problem for you ez pz." Nope. I was wrong.  ::help ::help

In regards to the Aventador, how accurate is the aesthetics (since it's somewhat new right)? Let me know your opinion. If you think it's good, then I would like one.

Looking forward to your response!

76mx

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2017, 02:55:15 PM »
Vanorin,
   You may not have all of your research done, but you are already approaching this more level headed than most. Because of that, I am interested, but be aware that I am already pretty buried in Chupacabra business. All of my builds are done the way you requested, I will only write a build order when face to face and at the end of that conference, you will have a document that lists everything, down to what gearshift knob. I am curious where you are located, but like 01 said, I would charge extra for you to come and watch. Final thing, if you want an Aventador, it would be very helpful to know by the end of next week, I am going to Mexico and bringing a load of them back.

Charley Strickland 

Vanorin287

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2017, 12:24:38 PM »
lambobuilder --

Great read. I've read through it a few times before also, and because of that I am trying to stay level headed going into a project like this.

My goal is not to build some crazy 600 AWD HP beast that smokes people, looks 100% accurate and also has the newest self-driving Tesla technology....

To narrow it down, what's important for me personally is:
1. Appearance -- being an attention to detail person, which kit / builds have been done enough times that now it's quite close in terms of aesthetics to the real thing.

2. Maintainability -- after it's built, how easy is it to maintain? Not just talking oil changes, but sensors, scheduled maintenance, etc... That's also the reason why I want to shy away from using advertised "twin-turbo" setups, and often OLD muscle car engines/trannies. It's getting harder to find a lot of those replacement parts, if something DOES break, and I know for sure things will break.

It's been my dream to drive a Lamborghini since I was 10. Sure, maybe if I saved for 30 years I could afford the real thing, but I am willing to put in work now (before family, kids, etc...).

01Lambiero --

Yup, you are right. What would you think would be the best steps before going into the replica world? Would it make sense to go visit people who have builds to see what they are like, and how they drive? Are they even willing to have a stranger over?  ::salute ::salute

Not married, no kids, I just work and have no life. This is something that I can truly devote some time to, even 40+ hours a week if needed. A personality fault really, I tend to either do things 100% and the right way, or not do it at all.

In terms of parts, we are talking about the internals right? There doesn't seem to be a reason for having OEM internal parts, unless they are really needed. Due to my ignorance, not even sure what comes with the body/interior kits. All I see are these cool builds on youtube or forum posts.

Thanks for putting it into perspective, really appreciate it. From reading the forums, it makes sense to a) find a finished or semi finished build or b) find a reputable builder who's willing to sit down and discuss some details, explain the process.

It seems like any builder found through Google or youtube are full of it, or they are just really busy and don't want to take on new projects.

Thanks for the honest response.


lambobuilder

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2017, 12:14:42 PM »
Check out the "Advice to Newbies" section. You will also find links to my three part series "So you want to build a kit car?"
http://lamboclone.com/index.php?topic=2685.0
Dale

01Lambiero

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2017, 11:02:11 AM »
I think all of your questions have already been answered on this forum.  If you find a reliable builder, he won't let you come to his shop and help him.  His shop will not be located in your locale.  Your body can be built in Mexico.  No two chassis' are the same.  Have you ever seen a Toyota powered replica?  What area of expertise do you feel you are qualified in?  Welding, fabrication, mechanical, electrical, paint, body work, etc?  How big is your mortgage payment?   Are you married?  How many kids do you have?  Do you feel that you need OEM parts or can you make your own parts?  Do you own a mig or tig welder, drill press, lathe, or end mill?  These are all part or will be part of your replica build.  There is an unseen cost in every build diary that each of us don't talk about and it's "sacrifice".  The price is costly.

01
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 11:05:04 AM by 01Lambiero »
20 yr. GM Niase certified Auto Mechanic (Tune-Up, Brakes, & Heavy Repair)
24 yr. GM Automated/Robotic Welding Systems
Retired

Vanorin287

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2017, 10:15:25 AM »
Neils88 --

I don't mind putting in 20+ hrs a week on a project like this. After going through various build dairies and just following what people have done, building one from zero to finish takes a lot of work. $50,000+ seems reasonable, for a Lamborghini...

How much do parts usually run? If I had to create a budget of $X what would be a good ballpark for the kit, engine, trans, suspension, and pretty much the mechanical portion of it all?

diablodoc --

Which parts are hard to come by?

Your advice seems reasonable; only downside is finding someone who's reliable. Did some research on a few builders -- robslp640, kitcarinc, superreplicas, etc.. they all seem like bad scams.

« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 12:27:35 PM by Vanorin287 »

diablodoc

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2017, 09:22:35 AM »
There are many roads to success when building a Lambo replica, but none of them are quick and easy.  Most require an adequate work space (for the next 10 years), good basic skills, a LOT of time and a minimum of $40k (that may be optimistic as parts are getting very hard to come by).  If you don't have all of these things, save yourself a lot of time and heartache and just buy a completed replica from someone who has done a good job but just wants to move on to the next project.

Neils88

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Re: Long time researcher
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2017, 04:52:36 PM »
Welcome to the forum!

You are correct that there are many kit car scams out there, so you definitely want to tread carefully whichever route you take.  The first step is lots of research on this and other similar forums.  Get to know the people...you'll learn quickly who the best contacts are.

Next be clear on the time, skill, effort and cost should you decide to jump down this rabbit hole.  I always tell people that those who are successful in their builds almost always have done so since they are passionate about the build process, not the end goal.  You will be committing 3000+ hours...most people don't grasp what this level of effort involves.  If the thought of putting 20+ hours a week into a single project for the next 6 or 7 years scares you, then consider investing in a project that is already complete or nearing completion.  If you think $50K+ on a car is too much...then you definitely need to reconsider...   ::toothy  People who tell you that you can do it for less are probably trying to sell you something.

I also recommend keeping a build thread on one of the forums.  I've found that documenting everything is great for future reference and helps keep me on track.

Best of luck!

Vanorin287

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Long time researcher
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2017, 02:50:09 PM »
Ever since I was in high school I've been lurking the forums, reading build diaries, and just seeing what the art of the possible was. It's come a long way in the last 6-7 years!

Becoming a big boy now, and saving some money to build the dream car. Tried to keep up with known builders or websites, but they all seem to come and go or are complete scams (according to some people?). Not sure if it's competition that's trying to hurt their business or people are actually getting away with stealing $20,000 - $80,000!!!

Trying to save enough money to buy the required parts for a solid kit. Although, I may not have space to start a build at home, I'd be willing to pay someone or even take off work to help build one.

Seems like now tubular chassis are popular instead of the Fiero stretched frames. Here's what I was thinking would be a modest build:
  • Tubular chassis (whichever has the best/correct dimensions)
  • Accurate body kit + interior -- I am not set on any particular model, just one that would be the most accurate, easy parts to get
  • A Toyota V6 or possibly an older Merc. V12 -- the Toyota's seem straight forward, while the Merc. V12's may have some ECU/electrical issues?
The primary goal is to get something that looks proportional with reliable internals, somewhat easy to replace parts & maintain the car.

My background is in engineering, and I've had access to some great tools at school. Being an alum I could probably still use the mechanical engineering department's tools.

Looking forward to hopefully starting a build and meeting new people!