Author Topic: **Questions about plexiglass  (Read 2392 times)

minihawn

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2015, 08:48:41 AM »
I have used mar guard lexan for windows there ok but I keep striving to put the real thing in it but finding the real part is vary hard to find as well as costly. I'm on a new mission to have functional windows next project !


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thank u. so do they look like real glass? i mean is it vary noticeable that its not glass
?
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Mudman

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2015, 08:43:44 AM »
I have used mar guard lexan for windows there ok but I keep striving to put the real thing in it but finding the real part is vary hard to find as well as costly. I'm on a new mission to have functional windows next project !


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Robert

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2015, 11:11:38 PM »
Acrylic and poly got bad reputations mostly because people bought them too thin.  Every window in a airplane, from a small plane to a commercial jet liner is polycabonate.  They do scratch easier than glass of course but that's the only real down side.  If you are dealing with custom glass, you could afford to change them out when they get scratched many times and still be ahead of getting custom glass made.  There are at least 2 polycarbonate auto glass makers making a mark in the industry as well.
Believe it or not, you can polish minor scratches out of the poly carbonate. 3M #1 compound, 3m #2 glaze polish. Works well. These are for wheeling automotive paint.
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76mx

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2015, 09:16:03 AM »
Whatever you do, make sure you get the green tinted one. If not, it will absolutely look like cheap plastic.

minihawn

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2015, 09:07:13 AM »
For being specific and concise I will definitely keep updates here very soon on the progress I'm actually headed to the garage right now to work on the window frame . Thanks
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Bartman

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2015, 08:02:34 AM »
Acrylic and poly got bad reputations mostly because people bought them too thin.  Every window in a airplane, from a small plane to a commercial jet liner is polycabonate.  They do scratch easier than glass of course but that's the only real down side.  If you are dealing with custom glass, you could afford to change them out when they get scratched many times and still be ahead of getting custom glass made.  There are at least 2 polycarbonate auto glass makers making a mark in the industry as well.

minihawn

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2015, 05:53:35 AM »
Lexan(polycarbonate) is available standard, scratch proof one side, or scratchproof both sides. It is heat formable just like acrylic but the process kills the scratchproofing to some degree. Use the 1/4 thick, not just because it adds rigidity, but all of the commonly available felts, tracks, and channels are for 1/4.

Sounds like a plan
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76mx

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2015, 09:51:18 PM »
Lexan(polycarbonate) is available standard, scratch proof one side, or scratchproof both sides. It is heat formable just like acrylic but the process kills the scratchproofing to some degree. Use the 1/4 thick, not just because it adds rigidity, but all of the commonly available felts, tracks, and channels are for 1/4.

minihawn

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2015, 05:57:10 PM »
Are you going to have operating windows?  Are you thinking of 3/16 inch or 1/4 inch thick?
Plexiglass: cheaper than Lexan but scratches easily.  Heat to 450 degrees for 12 minutes and lay on a curved form.  You will need a large oven for a 16x46 window.  A heat gun does not make for a smooth curve.
Lexan: Sort of resistant to scratching but there are polish and coat kits for that.  Lexan can be cold bent but has recoil when released.  You have to overbend it.  In my feeble brain, I came up with a roller jig which should be able to do a cold bend on Lexan which has the paper on both sides to protect the finish.  The jig would have to be maybe 48 inches in length.  Diameter of rollers would be optional.  Looks good on paper.  ::thumbup ::scratch ::zzzzz

Working Windows and thinking 1/4 (good?) Thank u for such a precise response. ::salute
« Last Edit: November 16, 2015, 05:59:27 PM by minihawn »
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01Lambiero

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2015, 02:13:38 PM »
Are you going to have operating windows?  Are you thinking of 3/16 inch or 1/4 inch thick?
Plexiglass: cheaper than Lexan but scratches easily.  Heat to 450 degrees for 12 minutes and lay on a curved form.  You will need a large oven for a 16x46 window.  A heat gun does not make for a smooth curve.
Lexan: Sort of resistant to scratching but there are polish and coat kits for that.  Lexan can be cold bent but has recoil when released.  You have to overbend it.  In my feeble brain, I came up with a roller jig which should be able to do a cold bend on Lexan which has the paper on both sides to protect the finish.  The jig would have to be maybe 48 inches in length.  Diameter of rollers would be optional.  Looks good on paper.  ::thumbup ::scratch ::zzzzz
20 yr. GM Niase certified Auto Mechanic (Tune-Up, Brakes, & Heavy Repair)
24 yr. GM Automated/Robotic Welding Systems
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minihawn

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2015, 01:42:13 PM »
I would look for sites that deal with chop tops and such. I know Pennocks has members with chop top Fieros and and you could check their experiences.

Sure thing
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Havemurci

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2015, 12:46:43 PM »
I would look for sites that deal with chop tops and such. I know Pennocks has members with chop top Fieros and and you could check their experiences.

Robert

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2015, 12:17:41 PM »
Minihawn,
   Plexiglass is a trade name for acrylic plastic, Lexan is a trade name for polycarbonate plastic. They are two entirely different things with entirely different characteristics. Polycarbonate is an acceptable possibility, acrylic is not. The Lexan brand of poly is available in green tint to match a windshield.
Robert,
   Title 51 of the Federal Transportation Code says that windows must be of a "Shatterproof" material. I have seen this happen before, your state has no authority to rewrite the Federal Law.
HHMM... Thanks MX
Robert, Journeyman experimental mechanic, Journeyman experimental painter.

minihawn

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2015, 11:45:40 AM »
Was just wondering if anyone here has used lexan for their DOOR glass, and if so how does it look? Does it look  formidable Or is it as worse as some of the guys have made it out to be? Does it look for
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minihawn

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Re: **Questions about plexiglass
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2015, 11:39:09 AM »
Minihawn,
   Plexiglass is a trade name for acrylic plastic, Lexan is a trade name for polycarbonate plastic. They are two entirely different things with entirely different characteristics. Polycarbonate is an acceptable possibility, acrylic is not. The Lexan brand of poly is available in green tint to match a windshield.
Robert,
   Title 51 of the Federal Transportation Code says that windows must be of a "Shatterproof" material. I have seen this happen before, your state has no authority to rewrite the Federal Law.

 So if I substituted  the word "plexiglass"  with  "lexan" . What  would your opinion be then? Thx
« Last Edit: November 16, 2015, 11:42:56 AM by minihawn »
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